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Introduction

An exciting new LEGO-themed space mission is about to begin, and you’re invited to join the adventure! Astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) will be building LEGO Education models, completing activities, and recording their results starting this year!

Explore life in space with your elementary students or investigate how simple machines react in microgravity with your class!

Blog

  • SUNDAY, MAY 26, 2013

    LEGO® MINDSTORMS® in Space

    Are you ready for learning what is literally out of this world? The culminating video exploring robotics in space is ready for viewing, complete with a never-before-seen LEGO® MINDSTORMS® NXT GyroBot.

    In this activity, your students and the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education NXT Set and Software to investigate the effects of microgravity on a gyroscope. Follow along as Astronaut Kevin Ford challenges your students to explore first-hand Newton’s Third Law of Motion.

    Corresponding activity materials include a video filmed on the International Space Station, a teacher guide, student worksheet, building instructions, and sample programs – all downloadable.

    This is the final activity in the LEGO Bricks in Space Program. We hope you and your students have found the lessons and videos both fun and inspiring. On behalf of LEGO Education and NASA, thank you for coming with us on this educational journey.

  • TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 05, 2013

    Learning Takes Flight with the New WeDo Airplane Video!

    The second video exploring robotics in space is ready for viewing and prepare for student learning to take flight.

    In this activity, young learners and the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) will use the LEGO® Education WeDo Construction Set and Software to investigate the effects of microgravity on a robotic airplane. Follow along as Astronaut Sunita Williams explores how a tilt sensor behaves in space and much more.

    This lesson includes a video filmed on the International Space Station, a teacher guide, and a student worksheet – all downloadable.

    The next phase of the LEGO Bricks in Space Program featuring a never-before-seen LEGO MINDSTORMS® Education NXT model with corresponding teacher materials will be posted in the upcoming weeks; keeping your students busy exploring and learning about robotics in space.

  • MONDAY, DECEMBER 03, 2012

    Explore Robots In Space!

    The first video exploring robotics in space is ready for viewing and prepare to be blown away!

    In this activity, young learners and the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) will use the LEGO Education WeDo Robotics Set to investigate the effects of friction and microgravity on a robotic spinning top. Other scientific concepts covered include rotation, gearing up and down, and much more.

    This lesson includes a video filmed on the International Space Station, a teacher guide, and a student worksheet – all downloadable.

    Keep in mind the second video utilizing the LEGO Education WeDo Set with corresponding teacher materials will be posted in three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring and learning about robotics in space.

  • THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012

    Questions from visitors

    Visitor said... I love Legos. I love space and science. How are these activities suppose to build scientific knowledge. They just seem a fancy way to deliver facts and have them write them down on a worksheet. Where is the hands on experimenting? The hypothesizing? The REAL learning? Am I missing something?

    LEGO said... Essentially, the astronauts onboard the ISS are performing scientific experiments with various LEGO Education products. After completion, they transmit their resulting footage back to Earth. We then make the videos live on LEGOspace.com, along with accompanying worksheets so the activities can be performed in classrooms and science centers across the globe.

    Teachers who have the LEGO Education Sets used in the activities can follow along and compare the results on the ISS to what they examine happening on Earth. Teachers who don’t have the set can still present the materials to their class and explore effects of microgravity on simple machines.

    Visitor said... What is the best grade level to use these activities?

    LEGO said... This program is geared towards all learners who have an interest in space exploration. However, the 9686 Set which is utilized in a number of the educational activities is intended for students ages 8+.

  • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 04, 2012

    Blast off with the Rocketing into Space Video!

    The final video featuring the LEGO Education Space and Airport Set is ready for viewing and your students are going to be thrilled.

    In this activity, young learners and the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) will explore using rockets to travel through space while investigating scientific concepts such as propulsion, friction, and more.

    This lesson includes a video filmed on the International Space Station, a teacher guide, and a student worksheet – all downloadable.

    The posting of this material marks the end of the first phase of the LEGO Bricks in Space Program. Up next, phase II which explores LEGO robotics in space. Stay posted as Sunita Williams, newly named Captain of the International Space Station, delivers some exciting lessons for your classroom.

  • TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012

    Watch student learning take off with the Space Buggy Exploration Video!

    The first video featuring the LEGO Education Space and Airport Set is ready for viewing and your students are going to love it.

    In this activity, young learners and the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) will investigate space vehicles and the various terrains they must traverse.
    This lesson includes a video filmed on the International Space Station, a teacher guide, and a student worksheet – all downloadable.

    Keep in mind the second video utilizing the Space and Airport Set with corresponding teacher materials will be posted in three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring and learning about space.

  • THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012

    Investigate space travel with the new land yacht video!

    Follow along on board the International Space Station (ISS) as Astronaut Don Pettit explores using a land yacht to travel in space!

    In this activity, your students will work as a team and use the scientific method to determine the effectiveness of a LEGO Land Yacht in microgravity.
    This lesson explores concepts such as air resistance, pressure, and friction and also challenges learners to investigate forces and design solutions. It also includes downloadable resources such as a video filmed on the ISS, teacher’s notes, and student worksheets.

    Keep in mind that you can expect to see a new video with corresponding teacher materials posted every three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring and learning about space.

  • WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2012

    A question from a visitor

    Visitor said...
    How does it work?

    LEGO said...
    The material you see on this site is the result of an amazing partnership between NASA and LEGO Education. We are collaborating to create STEM-related classroom materials, which challenge student’s problem-solving skills and get them energized about space exploration.

    Essentially, the astronauts onboard the ISS are performing scientific experiments with two different LEGO Education products. After completion, they transmit their resulting footage back to Earth. We then make the videos live on LEGOspace.com, along with accompanying worksheets so the activities can be performed in classrooms and science centers across the globe. Teachers who have the LEGO Education Sets used in the activities can follow along and compare the results on the ISS to what they examine happening on Earth. Teachers who don’t have the set can still present the materials to their class and explore effects of microgravity on simple machines.

  • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 06, 2012

    More questions and comments from our visitors!

    Thank you all for the great comments and questions. Here below are some answers to you.

    Visitor said... Is there a kit just for these space activities?

    LEGO said... On this site there will be 6 activities posted that use the LEGO Education 9686 Machines and Mechanisms Set. There will also be two additional activities that utilize the 9335 Space and Airport Set. Both of these are currently available through LEGO Education.

    Visitor said... love this site!!!

    LEGO said... Yay! Thank you for the kind words. As partners in education, NASA and LEGO Education love making these unique resources available to your classroom.

    Visitor said... THIS IS THE BEST WEBSITE IN THE WORLD!

    LEGO said... Thanks so much! Be sure to continue to visit as additional resources and activities will be posted in the upcoming months.

  • TUESDAY, MAY 15, 2012

    Blast into outer space with the new Windmill Activity!

    From energy transfer to balanced and unbalanced forces, the new Windmill Activity from the LEGO Bricks in Space Program brings scientific topics to life!

    In this activity, your students and the crew onboard the International Space Station (ISS) will use the scientific method to determine the effectiveness of a LEGO Windmill in microgravity.

    This activity explores concepts such as energy capture, storage, and transfer and also challenges learners to investigate forces and design solutions. It also includes downloadable resources such as a video filmed on the ISS, teacher’s notes, and student worksheets.

    Keep in mind that you can expect to see a new video with corresponding teacher materials posted every three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring and learning about space throughout the remainder of the school year.

  • TUESDAY, MAY 15, 2012

    Questions from visitors

    Visitor said… when will these lego space products be for sale?

    LEGO said… The sets for these activities are actually available for purchase now from LEGO Education. You can visit them online.

    Visitor said… These are wonderful activities! When can we expect other activities to become available?

    LEGO said… You can expect a new activity posted every three weeks throughout the remainder of the school year and even a little into the summer months. Then we will take a little bit of a break and come back with new materials in the fall that explore the use of robotics in space!

    Visitor said… I love the show! I love space and astronomy.

    LEGO said… Thanks for the encouragement. We are so happy to be bringing engaging STEM learning materials to teachers and students alike.

  • MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2012

    Investigate the Effect of Microgravity on Pulleys with the Fishing Rod Activity and Video

    The fourth activity of the LEGO® Bricks in Space Program is ready, and we think your students are going to love it!

    In this activity, your learners and the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) will work as a team to build the LEGO Fishing Rod Model, perform a variety of experiments, and compare results to test their hypothesis.
    Some of the topics covered in this activity include: investigating pulleys, forces and motion, and measuring distance.
    This activity includes a video that was filmed on the International Space Station, a teacher guide, and a student worksheet – all downloadable.

    Keep in mind that you can expect to see a new video with corresponding teacher materials posted every three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring and learning about space throughout the remainder of the school year.

  • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2012

    New Beam Balance Activity is Out of this World!

    From Newton’s Second Law to Mass and Weight, the new Beam Balance Activity from the LEGO Bricks in Space Program brings scientific topics to life!

    In this activity, your students and the crew onboard the International Space Station (ISS) will use the scientific method to determine if a LEGO Beam Balance is effective in microgravity.
    This activity explores concepts such as Force, Equilibrium, Mass, Weight and more. It also includes downloadable resources such as a video filmed on the ISS, teacher’s notes, and student worksheets.

    Keep in mind that you can expect to see a new video with corresponding teacher materials posted every three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring and learning about space throughout the remainder of the school year.

  • FRIDAY, MARCH 02, 2012

    Questions to videos from ISS

    We have had some questions to some of the models used in the videos from ISS where the Astronauts work with LEGO models.

    Visitor said… Are the living and working in space models available?

    LEGO said… Unfortunately the Living and Working in Space models are one-of-a-kind. They were developed specifically for the LEGO Bricks in Space project to help astronauts illustrate to viewers what life is like aboard the International Space Station. You could of course always build your own versions.

    Visitor said… The ISS model shown in the video appears to be different from the LEGO 7467 Discovery set. Can you provide build instructions / parts for the model shown?

    LEGO said… The ISS model is also a one-off which was developed specifically for the LEGO Bricks in Space project. The LEGO model helped astronauts on board the International Space Station to show viewers what their home in space looks like, its various components, how it was built and how it operates. Kind of like giving somebody a tour of your house, but in a more manageable (and fun) scale. The ISS model is much larger than the 7467 Discovery set from 2003 – with a span of 2.5 feet by 3 feet, it is too large to support its own weight. It only stays together in space where there is no gravity, just like the real ISS. For this reason, among others, we currently have no plans to put the model in production…

  • FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2012

    Investigate Microgravity with the Hammer Activity and Video

    It’s finally here! The second activity of the LEGO® Bricks in Space Program is ready, and we think you are going to love it!

    In this activity, your students and the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) will work as a team to build the LEGO Hammer Model, perform a variety of experiments, and compare results to test their hypothesis.
    This activity includes a video that was filmed on the International Space Station, a teacher guide, and a student worksheet – all downloadable.

    Keep in mind that you can expect to see a new video with corresponding teacher materials posted every three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring and learning about space throughout the remainder of the school year.

  • TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012

    Questions and answers from visitors

    We have received a lot of comments and questions from all of you and here below are some answers.

    Vistor said.. What grade level is this program geared to?
    LEGO said... This program is geared towards all learners who have an interest in space exploration. However, the 9686 Set which is utilized in a number of the educational activities is intended for students aged 8+.

    Visitor said.. How did you come up with the idea to go to space
    LEGO said... The idea to get LEGO Bricks into Space and use them for educational activities was actually brought forward by an Astronaut who had spent time on board the ISS. She brought the idea forward and the rest is history!

    Visitor said... Will each activity posted in this series require the same 9686 kit?
    LEGO said... LEGO Education will be working with NASA to post 6 activities that use the 9686 Machines and Mechanisms Sets. There will also be two educational activities that utilize the 9335 Space and Airport Set that is also available through LEGO Education.

    More questions and answers will be posted next week.


  • WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012

    Explore Space with the Trundle Wheel Activity and Video

    Bring excitement into your classroom with the official launch of the LEGO Bricks in Space program for educators.

    Now available, the Trundle Wheel activity is the first of eight featured LEGO Education activities sent from the ISS to your classroom. This activity includes a downloadable teacher guide, student worksheet, and video that was filmed on the International Space Station. The Trundle Wheel activity demonstrates the effects of microgravity on simple machines and allowing students to measure and compare their physical work space to that on the ISS.

    Continue learning with additional activities! You can expect to see a new video with corresponding teacher materials posted every three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring and learning about space throughout the remainder of the school year.

    Questions? Submit your comments and inquiries below. As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but we will reply to each inquiry.

  • MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2012

    Explore Space in the New Year

    Start the year with us as we prepare to officially launch the LEGO Bricks in Space program for educators.

    This month the Trundle Wheel activity, the first of eight featured LEGO Education activities, will be added to the site and include a downloadable teacher guide and student worksheet plus video form the International Space Station showing the effects microgravity has on simple machines.
    After the first video is posted, you can expect to see a new video with corresponding teacher materials every three weeks, keeping your students busy exploring space throughout the remainder of the school year.

    Want to stay informed of when new videos are released? Join the growing database of U.S. educators interested in receiving updates about the LEGO Bricks in Space program! Visit LEGOeducation.us/LEGOspace to stay connected.

    Questions? Submit your comments and inquiries below. As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but every effort will be make to reply to each inquiry. We thank you in advance for your understanding and input.

  • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2011

    Learn What It's Like to Live and Work in Space

    Over a half dozen videos about living and working is space are now available for viewing!
    Take students on an adventure as they learn from JAXA Astronaut Satoshi Furukawa how International Space Station crew eat, sleep, shower, and even use the restroom in space!
    LEGO replicas bring fun and discovery into the lessons as Satoshi explains the differences and similarities between living and working on Earth and in space.

    To check out these videos with your students, select the Videos tab in the site’s header.

    Questions? Submit your comments and inquiries below. As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but every effort will be make to reply to each inquiry. We thank you in advance for your understanding and input.

    Stay Connected! Join the growing database of U.S. educators interested in receiving updates about the LEGO Bricks in Space classroom content! Visit http://www.LEGOeducation.us/LEGOspace to sign-up.

  • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 02, 2011

    Curiosity Takes to the Skies

    Curiosity, the largest and most sophisticated robotic rover NASA has sent to Mars, took off for the red planet on Saturday, November 26. The six-wheeled, one-ton vehicle is similar in size to a compact car and is brimming with an array of sophisticated scientific gadgets.
    The mobile laboratory will be on Mars for 23 months after landing, analyzing dozens of samples drilled from rocks or scooped from the ground as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover.

    Curiosity will carry the most advanced payload of scientific gear ever used on Mars’ surface. Its assignment is to investigate whether conditions have been favorable for microbial life and for preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life.
    To learn more about Curiosity and its mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/index.html.

    Questions? Submit your comments and inquiries below. As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but every effort will be make to reply to each inquiry. We thank you in advance for your understanding and input!

  • THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011

    Trundle Wheel on its way

    The first LEGO Education Bricks in Space activity is in final production and is expected to make its debut before the Thanksgiving holiday!

    The Trundle Wheel, utilizing the model from the Simple and Motorized Mechanisms Set (9686) was conducted by JAXA Astronaut, Satoshi Furukawa and will kick-off the in-class portion of the LEGO Bricks in Space program!

    Classroom and home educators can expect new activities investigating the effects of microgravity on simple machines every 2-3 weeks, until all eight educational activities are posted on LEGOspace.com.

    If you are a U.S. educators and want to learn more about the educational sets used in the LEGO Bricks in Space program or would like to register for regular updates on program activities, visit LEGO Space for U.S. Educators


    Questions? Submit your comments and inquiries below. As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but every effort will be make to reply to each inquiry. We thank you in advance for your understanding and input!

  • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011

    Microgravity and Clutch Power Collide

    The first LEGO Bricks in Space activity is complete and posted to the site! If you haven’t checked out the Clutch Power test featuring JAXA Astronaut, Satoshi Furukawa, you can access the video on the homepage or by clicking on the Videos tab above.

    Coming soon will be Living and Working in space followed by the Hubble Telescope and, of course, the start of the in-class segment beginning with the Trundle Wheel!

    To learn more about the educational sets used in the LEGO Bricks in Space program or to register for regular updates on program activities, visit www.LEGOeducation.us/LEGOspace

    Questions? Submit your comments and inquiries below. As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but every effort will be make to reply to each inquiry. We thank you in advance for your understanding and input!

  • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

    Education resources abound at NASA.gov

    Looking for a lesson plan that includes the history of space exploration or a classroom poster that shows the solar system? NASA can help!

    Hundreds of educator resources are available to teachers across the nation and around the world when you visit NASA.gov and click on the Educator’s tab. And they are all FREE!

    One of our favorites is the NASA Education Materials Finder. This online database allows you to search by keywords, grade level, product type, and subject. Hundreds of publications and web sites are indexed and everything from printable bookmarks to complete lesson plans and even video clips are chronicled. You can access the materials finder directly by visiting NASA for Educators


    Questions? Submit your comments and inquiries below. As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but every effort will be made to reply to each inquiry. We thank you in advance for your understanding and input!

  • TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011

    Create a space-themed classroom and watch your students turn into explorers

    Space exploration is fun, so why not create a classroom filled with opportunities for your young learners to investigate the possibilities of inter-galaxy travel.
    Whether you are celebrating the start of the school year or the launch of the LEGO® Bricks in Space program, below are a few suggestions we have on how you can spark the inner astronaut in all your students!
    -Have students help create a paper galaxy using construction paper and their imaginations! Hang their creations along the walls or from the ceiling.

    -Invite aliens into your class by giving students foam masks to decorate. Then parade around the classroom and explore Earth as an extra-terrestrial being.

    -Host an exploration hour in which students tell stories about their adventures as astronauts! Have them first write a space exploration story, then build one visual aids that correlates to what they discovered on their mission.

    Lots of great exploration fun is coming your way! Stay tuned as new videos are uploaded and the LEGO Bricks in Space program gets rolling! Questions? Submit your comments and inquiries below. As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but every effort will be make to reply to each inquiry. We thank you in advance for your understanding and input!

  • SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 04, 2011

    Living and Working in Space is complete

    On Thursday, September 1, the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) completed the second activity of the LEGO® Bricks in Space program, comparing life on board the ISS with life on Earth using LEGO models!

    The video is currently in transit and will be under review by NASA and the LEGO Group in the coming days. Once the video has been edited it will be uploaded to this web site and a post will appear here to announce its arrival.

    The LEGO Education activities are still on schedule to be completed later this month and posted in the fall. The first activity will be the Trundle Wheel, a measuring device built from the Simple and Motorized Mechanisms Set (9686).

    Downloadable teacher guides and student worksheets will be offered for all LEGO Education activities and found here on LEGOspace.com.

    In other news, we improved our comment section! As comments come in, we will select a sampling and reply with answers below each blog post. Not all comments will be posted, but every effort will be make to reply to each inquiry. We thank you in advance for your understanding and input!

    Questions? Submit your comments and questions below.

  • FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 2011

    Space Themed LEGO Club In-School Magazines Available

    LEGO® Education and LEGO Club are proud to offer U.S. schools the opportunity to share exclusive space-themed LEGO Club In-School Edition Magazines and corresponding Teacher’s Guides with second-, third- and fourth-grade classrooms, for FREE!
    These special publications are developed specifically for in-class use. They follow the LEGO philosophy of providing students with products that promote imagination, pique curiosity, and enhance learning.

    The LEGO Club In-School Edition Magazine focuses on basic reading, critical-thinking activities, and building ideas. The LEGO Education Teacher's Guide is filled with hands-on activities, classroom tidbits, and articles about how you can explore space and create a LEGO smart classroom for your students!
    To sign up to receive complimentary copies of the Space Exploration-themed LEGO Club In-School Edition Magazine and corresponding LEGO Education Teacher's Guide, complete the online order form at www.LEGOeducation.us/MagazineRequest.

    Questions? Submit your comments and questions below. We will pull questions and provide answers throughout the program!

  • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2011

    New Videos Coming Soon

    The LEGO® Bricks payload has been delivered and hundreds of LEGO elements are eagerly awaiting the opportunity to take their first spacewalk.

    Recently the first activity of the LEGO Bricks in Space program was completed on board the International Space Station. The clutch power test was completed by JAXA Astronaut, Satoshi Furukawa and the video is in transit to be edited and posted soon to this website.

    We are all VERY EXCITED to be able to offer these educational experiences! More videos and activities are on their way over the next several weeks. Classroom activities will begin soon as well, so if you are an educator or know one, be sure to share the excitement of the LEGO Bricks in Space program.

    Questions? Submit your comments and questions below. We will pull questions and provide answers throughout the program.

  • THURSDAY, AUGUST 04, 2011

    LEGO® Minifigures on a mission to promote space research

    LEGO® Minifigures on a mission to promote space research

    Three LEGO® Minifigures leave earth on the Juno deep-space probe today on a five-year mission to Jupiter to broaden awareness of the importance of planetary research.

    The specially-constructed aluminium Minifigures are the Roman god Jupiter, his wife Juno and ‘father of science’ Galileo Galilei. The LEGO crew’s mission is part of the LEGO Bricks in Space project, the joint outreach and educational programme developed as part of the partnership between NASA and the LEGO Group to inspire children to explore science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

    The LEGO Minifigures will help get attention for Juno’s mission to improve understanding of our solar system’s beginnings by revealing the origin and evolution of Jupiter. Underneath its dense cloud cover, Jupiter safeguards secrets to the fundamental processes and conditions that governed our solar system during its formation. As our primary example of a giant planet, Jupiter can also provide critical knowledge for understanding the planetary systems being discovered around other stars.

    Juno and the Minifigures are scheduled to arrive in July 2016 and will orbit Jupiter for a year (33 revolutions) before crashing onto the planet’s surface.

    Read more about about the Juni mission and Jupiter here: Juno mission and Jupiter

  • THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011

    A Few Comments from YOU

    A number of comments have been coming in and we wanted to take a moment to respond to a few!
    Q: Will people from the LEGO Group travel to space?
    A: No one from the LEGO Group will be traveling to space, but several of the bricks we know and love are up there now! We can’t wait to see the crew on board the International Space Station to get started building LEGO models!

    Q: How do you make a LEGO rocket?
    A: One of the greatest advantages of working for the LEGO Group is that you learn there is truly no wrong way to build a model! Our master builders spend hours searching for pictures and diagrams of various objects and 10x that amount of time attempting to recreate what they see in LEGO form. With practice and your imagination you’ll be building entire space colonies, not just rockets!

    Q: What sets will be used in the classroom?
    A: Two LEGO Education sets are being utilized in the education portion of the LEGO Bricks in Space project. These sets include the Simple and Powered Machines Set (9668) designed for students in upper elementary and middle school, and the Space and Airport Set (9335) developed for elementary classroom use. You can learn more about both sets by visiting LEGOeducation.com.
    That’s all for now, but keep those comments coming! We will answer as many as we can during the LEGO Bricks in Space project.

  • WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2011

    NASA Space Shuttle Art Competition

    In commemoration of the 30th Anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program, NASA, the National Institute of Aerospace and USA TODAY invite students, ages 9-17, to participate in the NASA Space Shuttle Art Competition by creating an original artwork that reflects the impact of the Space Shuttle program on our planet and in our lives.

    As a component of the Because It Flew (BIF) program students are asked to submit an individual artwork with a 250-word essay explaining their artistic entries. The submissions will be reviewed by an expert panel of artists and the top six entries will receive a cash prize, a private tutoring session with an accomplished USA TODAY graphic artist, and a certificate of accomplishment. The deadline for submission is August 5, 2011.

    BIF also offers teachers, sponsors, and parents an opportunity to engage their students with FREE educational activities and online NASA resources that allows students to discover the scientific and technological advances that have emerged Because It Flew.

    Encourage students and children to explore the history of the Space Shuttle Program, upload their photo and submit their artwork and essay!

    For more information on the NASA Space Shuttle Art Competition and to download free educational materials visit the site at: usatodayeducate.com

  • WEDNESDAY, JULY 06, 2011

    Onward and Upward: Space Shuttle Atlantis Slated to Launch July 8

    All eyes will be toward the skies near the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida on July 8th as space shuttle Atlantis is set to liftoff on the final flight of the shuttle program, STS-135!

    The 12-day mission to the International Space Station will carry the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module to deliver supplies, logistics and spare parts to the International Space Station.

    The mission will also fly a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and return a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems.

    Atlantis will be operated by a crew of four: Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley, and Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim.

    To learn more about STS-135, visit www.nasa.gov and click on the Shuttles and Station Mission tab in the right nav.


  • THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 2011

    Get Your Face in Space

    Among the many interactive and fun programs NASA offers today’s space explorer is their successful Face in Space web site!

    Face in Space allows visitors, provided they register and agree to the site’s rules and regulations, to upload a picture of their face or type in their name for inclusion in the final flight of the Space Shuttle program!

    All submitted photos and names will be flown aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis when it launches July 8!

    Once you upload your image or name, simply print out the confirmation page and return to the web site after the shuttle launches to print your personalized Flight Certificate – a commemorative certificate signed by the Mission Commander!

    Join us by commemorating the final journey of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and the last mission of the Space Shuttle program! All uploads must be submitted by launch, so you still have time!

    Visit Face in Space


  • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011

    Meet Your LEGO® Bricks in Space Crew

    A total of four astronauts have been selected as your LEGO Bricks in Space crew! Each will use LEGO CITY Space Port and LEGO Education models while on board the International Space Station to investigate simple machines in microgravity and talk about life in space.

    Over the next several months each crew member will complete experiments and send their results and crew commentary for you to download and view on LEGOspace.com!

    Please join us in welcoming:

    Ron Garan Read Ron Garan's Bio
    Mike Fossum Read Mike Fossum's Bio
    Dan Burbank Read Dan Burbank's Bio
    and
    Don Pettit Read Don Pettit's Bio

    to the LEGO Bricks in Space project!

  • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

    Share Your Thoughts!

    Do you have a comment or a question about the LEGO Bricks in Space project? Submit it here!

    Thanks to the efforts of our amazing web site team, you are now able to ask us questions, submit group inquiries, and, most importantly, post your classroom results when the LEGO Bricks in Space activities become available later this fall!

    All comments will be moderated, so you won’t see a response immediately, but every effort will be made to post responses and updates on a regular basis.

    So what do you want to know about the LEGO Bricks in Space program? Chances are there are others out there wondering the same thing, so submit your inquiries and comments!

    Blog moderators are standing by... :)

  • THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2011

    Bricks in Space

    On 16 May, Space Shuttle Endeavour was launched. On board was 13 LEGO Education sets for the International Space Station.

    Onboard the ISS, the astronauts will explore the effects of microgravity on simple machines by building models, conducting experiments, and sharing those results with students and teachers back on Earth through video and crew commentary. Each activity will have a downloadable teacher’s guide and student worksheet so that the same activities can be conducted by students on Earth and the results compared and contrasted.

    Stay tuned for more information...

  • TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2011

    Check out the Space Game

    Build your own rocket and launch it into outer space! Try the exciting Space Game, which comes in two versions.

    Junior LEGONAUT


    A simple and playful version for young children
    Design a rocket that rocks! Why not give it a nose, dragon wings or puppy power?
    Launch it and watch out for the surprises… Or simply build a more authentic version to maximize rocket performance.

    LEGONAUT Pilot


    A more detailed and challenging version for older children
    Earn meters (points) and more elements based on rocket performance and get access to building more complex rockets as you move through the stages.
    Follow rocket specs such as weight, aerodynamics, thrust and stability as you’re building. Learn about different rocket types by checking out the Building Plans.
    Dr. Stan Flash and R.A.Y are ready to help you with insights and tips and tricks.

    Get building and see if your rocket will go the distance?!

  • FRIDAY, MARCH 04, 2011

    Welcome to the Educator Blog!

    Welcome to the LEGOspace.com Educator Blog!

    We've designed this blog for educators around the world! Here you will find information about each of our space-themed LEGO activities and how you can use this program in your classroom!

    When the 2011-2012 school year begins this fall, we will post regular program updates and educational tidbits for use in classrooms. As an educator you are encouraged to follow along and implement these activities into your class study about simple machines and space exploration. A downloadable teacher's guide including learning objectives, vocabulary, and student worksheets, will be provided for each activity. (Featured activities are listed to the right.)

    From time to time we will also feature links and articles to educational materials that relate to space exploration and discovery. In the near future you will be able to sign-up to receive emails about major updates and milestones within the program, as well as post comments and questions to blog posts.

    Again, welcome to the LEGOspace.com Educator's Blog! Together we will launch imagination, share inspiration, and build the future!

    Post a Comment

    Drag the  brick to the circle in order to post a question/comment.

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    Drop Target
    • SPACE

      Don't let gravity hold you down

    • THE BRICKS

      Building our future one LEGO brick at a time

    • SPACE

      Taking learning from the classroom to the ISS

    • SPACE

      Connect to our orbiting classroom

    • THE FUTURE

      Let’s build and explore the future!

    • THE BRICKS

      LEGO® bricks and NASA will take you out of this world!

    Activities

    Will be uploaded on an regular
    basis starting this year

    • Gyrobot:

      Gyrobot:

      In this activity, students will work with the LEGO® MINDSTORMS® Education NXT to discover the effects of microgravity on a gyroscope.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Airplane Rescue:

      Airplane Rescue:

      Let us use an experiment to determine how a model will react in microgravity vs on Earth. By creating a programmable model to demonstrate knowledge and operation of digital tools and technological systems.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Smart Spinner:

      Smart Spinner:

      Explore the effects of microgravity on a robotic spinning top while investigating scientific concepts such as rotation, friction, and more.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Rocketing into Space:

      Rocketing into Space:

      Explore using rockets to travel through space while investigating scientific concepts such as propulsion, friction, and more.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Space Buggy Explorations:

      Space Buggy Explorations:

      Discover how vehicles are used in space travel.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Land Yacht:

      Land Yacht:

      A solar sail can bear many resemblances to the classic sail used in ships since the advent of sailing. The notable difference is the solar sail is designed for space travel, not for the sea or land.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Windmill:

      Windmill:

      Explore concepts such as energy capture, storage, and transfer and challenge learners to investigate forces and design solutions.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Trundle Wheel:

      Trundle Wheel:

      Use a trundle wheel to compare the working area on board the International Space Station to your classroom dimensions.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Hammer:

      Hammer:

      Investigate forces in microgravity by using the scientific method.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Beam Balance:

      Beam Balance:

      Understand the difference between mass and weight on board the International Space Station.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

    • Fishing Rod

      Fishing Rod

      Demonstrate how a fishing rod functions and learn about the effects microgravity has on pulley systems.

      To see the product used click here

      To see the activity click here

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